The three key qualities required for digital leadership

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The three key qualities required for digital leadership

What are the leadership qualities so needed today to truly align with the new workforce of tomorrow? Francis Goh, CEO, HehSed Consulting, clarifies.

In this age of disruption, the environment has significantly changed, resulting in change as a constant. How have the dynamics in people and talent management evolved and what are the qualities in leadership needed today to truly align with the new workforce of tomorrow? The rate of change in business productivity significantly lags behind the rate of change in technology. This productivity is further broken down as an individual and as an organisation, where the latter lags further behind the individual. There is a name for the new reality that we are treading in – the VUCA world.  The ability for one to be able to stay relevant, yet transcend above the tide, to emerge as a successful person in whatever he/she does. Technological advancement has surpassed beyond human imagination, with Moore’s Law confirming the rate of increase in transistors per square inch. The cadence period used to be 18 months for the past few decades. In 2017, Intel stated that hyperscaling in computing power and architecture would continue the trend of Moore’s law and offset the increased cadence by aggressively scaling beyond the typical doubling of transistors. Therefore, in the VUCA world, the emergence of the digital leader is imperative, to manage the vortex of change and development. Three key qualities stand out as new digital leadership qualities:

Leverage the qualities of digital megatrends

The ability to fully comprehend, understand and apply the impact of digital megatrends is tantamount to a sailor looking through his navigation tools to plan and predict the future. These megatrends include blockchain, internet of things (IoT), artificial intelligence (AI), augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), cloud computing, drones, driverless vehicles, and more, and they have big impact on our everyday life. While many of these technologies are no longer new, but their applications are vast and venture into unexplored territories. ALSO READ: HRUnplugged: The top ways HR has evolved in recent years The digital leader would need to possess the mindset, mental capability and foresight, to leverage on these technologies, creating new applications and solutions within his/her sphere of influence. This could often result in the development of new and creative solutions and problem-solving instances. Coupled with the scalability of various technologies, the impact is far greater than expected.

Obsess over the connected customer

In today’s context, consumers have unparalleled choice. With the proliferation of information and cross-border transparencies across all commerce channels, the power has shifted from the business to the consumer. Therefore, customer loyalty is a challenge. ALSO READ: By 2024, 60-70% of talent development to be based on experiential learning The digital leader must possess the ability to emotionally connect with his/her customers, through hard and soft skills, by leveraging on the various technological tools available. Understanding and breaking down the entire customer journey into micro-steps, as well as evaluating and analysing all potential opportunities will enhance the customer experience and delivery process. In short, the customer is at the centre of the business model, cutting across, people, processes, systems, and tools.

Adapt to different generations of employees

The entry of the newest generation into our workforce, Generation Z has elevated Millennials to the title of the more senior group, thus providing more groups of people to focus on. Yet, outdated management styles continue to stifle organisation integration, synthesis, and growth. ALSO READ: The forgotten workforce generation Some leaders in corporations are now managing teams across four generations of employees, i.e. Baby Boomers, Gen X, Millennials (Gen Y), and Gen Z. Therefore, the versatility and agility in their leadership styles are far more relevant in context of these mixed workforce dynamics of the workforce. Digital leaders evidently must possess the ability to adapt to different generations, through a unique blend of agility, dynamism, emotional connection, and character.
Francis Goh is the CEO of HehSed Consulting, which specialises in corporate strategy, innovation and leadership. Having served as the CEO of Mercer Singapore and Fujitsu Singapore previously, he has a track record of building high-performance teams and overachieving both revenue and profit targets. This August, he will be bringing his expertise to the table with a masterclass on developing digital leaders of the future. Joining him as co-facilitator is Brigette Hyacinth, an international leadership influencer with more than a million followers on LinkedIn.  
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission.
Original can be found at
https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/the-three-key-qualities-required-for-digital-leadership/

A better employee experience boosts employer branding: study

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A better employee experience boosts employer branding: study

According to this recently released white paper, Enriching the employee experience, Hong Kong’s positive jobs outlook means the challenge to source and keep talent remains ever present.

And providing the best possible employee experience is a good way to win the battle. It can also have the added benefit of improving your employer brand.

“The employee experience is the sum of perceptions employees have based on their interactions with the organisation. A positive employee experience encompasses all of the various touch-points throughout the employee’s life cycle,” said Natellie Sun, managing director of Randstad Hong Kong, which published the white paper.

“A positive employee experience holds unlimited potential to strengthen your employer brand. This, at the same time, improves workforce productivity, employee attraction and retention.

“That’s why the employee experience is crucial to any meaningful conversation about employer branding.”

Perceptions around an organisation’s brand matter. Employees are increasingly willing to speak their mind and websites such as Glassdoor are making it easier for these opinions to be widely known.

According to iCIMS’s “Modern Job Search Report”, almost 33% of potential candidates have refused a job offer due to negative online reviews.

Even companies such as Uber, Amazon, Google and Microsoft have suffered damage to their brands as employees – current or former – have publicly voiced their dissatisfaction, either online or via the media.

HR has now been propelled into the age of digital disruption – with the rise of social media and artificial intelligence and data analytics. It can be a double-edged sword, but clearly it’s better to embrace the change than be daunted by it.

The brave new digital world allows us to achieve much with a simple tap or swipe. As a result, employees expect their job to parallel the seamless brand experience they enjoy outside of working hours.

Companies must embrace this challenge or risk losing their best and brightest to their rivals.

Organisations share similar milestones that can enhance the employee experience such as candidate attraction, recruitment, onboarding, employee development, management, employee departures and alumni.

How well each stage is mapped out and executed says a lot about your company’s brand. And, in turn, what your employees say about your company.

“We know from research that having a positive employee experience will lead to higher advocacy, higher empowerment and stronger buy-in – all proven to lead to better business results,” Sun said.

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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original article can be found at  
https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/how-to-implement-job-sharing-in-your-organisation/

The top three hiring challenges you may face

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The top three hiring challenges you may face

Hiring top talent is no walk in the park. According to Robert Half’s new survey of more than 2,800 senior managers based in the United States, companies face a number of challenges throughout the hiring process. The top three being generating interest from qualified candidates (35%), asking the right interview questions (20%), and developing compensation packages and negotiating salaries (19%).   The most common reason prospective hires decide not to join their company is compensation, according to three in 10 senior managers. An equal number also reported that applicants declined to accept another position or counteroffer.   The research also found the biggest stumbling blocks for senior managers when writing job descriptions were separating essential from preferred qualifications (29%) and identifying the necessary interpersonal and soft skills (24%).   Then there’s the problem of failed hires which, 30% of senior managers attributed to mismatched skill sets, apart from poor performance. Additionally, unclear performance expectations (26%) and personality conflicts (23%) together accounted for nearly half of hiring mistakes.   Among the 28 U.S. cities in the survey, Indianapolis, Nashville, Cleveland, Sacramento and Minneapolis have the most employers who said capturing candidates’ interest is their top hiring obstacle.  
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original can be found at
https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/the-top-three-hiring-challenges-you-may-face/

Is it time for your company to invest in a chatbot?

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Is it time for your company to invest in a chatbot?

According to a recently published survey, 87% of CEOs are seeking to expand their artificial intelligence (AI) workforce. And, increasingly, this means chatbots.

For those less tech-savvy among us, according to Wikipedia: “A chatbot is a computer programme or an AI which conducts a conversation via auditory or textual methods. Such programmes are often designed to convincingly simulate how a human would behave as a conversational partner, thereby passing the Turing test.”

Some of the advantages of chatbots include a reduction in costs, streamlining interactions, (arguably) improve the customer experience, and saving time on repetitive tasks – something that would undoubtedly be welcomed by HR.

But is a chatbot right for your organisation? Depending on the quality of the chatbot selected – and the technology is improving all the time – it could improve your customers’ experiences or leave them feeling very frustrated. We’ve all dealt with automated voice systems that are comically inadequate.

But in defence of the humble chatbot, here are a few of the pluses:

Chatbots provide a quick and accurate response

This benefit is particularly applicable to human resources. Improvements in natural language processing mean that chatbots are now able to communicate convincingly with people in human language, including both your customers and employees.

Previously, when faced with a question, employees had to send emails to their HR department and wait for a response. HR bots have access to centralised databases containing all the necessary information regarding company policies and can provide instant and relevant answers.

Chatbots take the stress out of recruitment

Hiring can be a stressful process for HR. In a time-strapped work environment, a significant recruitment drive can mean hundreds of CVs and LinkedIn profiles to sift through.

This could be especially handy for small and medium-sized businesses not wishing to invest in dedicated software. Chatbots can help streamline the screening process, perform basic background checks and potentially eliminate any unconscious bias related to gender, race or age – helping to whittle down a shortlist of candidates quickly and efficiently.

Chatbots can smooth the onboarding process

Especially when your organisation is rolling out new tools or workflows that require extensive employee training, onboarding can be time-consuming, expensive and repetitive. Involving not only a lot of paperwork and compliance, onboarding also forms a big part of a newly hired employee’s first impression of your organisation. Chatbots can help streamline the process.

 
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original article can be found at 
https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/is-it-time-for-your-company-to-invest-in-a-chatbot/