Top 10 job skills for 2020

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Top 10 job skills for 2020

As we leave behind a decade of disruption, and stride boldly into one that could bring even greater disruption, we look at the 10 job skills HR pros and their charges need to meet the challenges of 2020 – and beyond – head on.

1. Data literacy

Data is fast becoming every company’s most prized asset – the fuel that drives business. Organisations that don’t use that fuel to maximise their chances of success will be at a disadvantage against their competitors. To maximise the impact of this data, companies must hire candidates who have data literacy skills and the ability to harness it potential.

 2. Critical thinking

In the modern workplace, there’s no shortage of information, but those with the ability to discriminate between information that’s trustworthy among the dizzying mishmash of misinformation – such as fakes news and propaganda – will be crucial to the company’s success.  3. Being tech savvy Technical skills will be required by HR and employees alike. AI, the Internet of Things (IoT), virtual reality, robotics and more (some as yet unforeseen) will become a part of an employee’s daily experience. Awareness – and an ability to apply – these technologies and relevant technical skills will become a necessity for every job from hairstylist to accountant to factory worker to lawyer.

 4. Adaptability and flexibility

It’s essential to grasp that what worked yesterday might not be the best strategy for tomorrow, so a willingness to unlearning skills and acquiring new ones is crucial. People must be cognitively flexible to new ideas and ways of doing things.

 5. Creativity

Despite the increased role of data and AI, it still takes a human to be creative. It’s crucial that creative individuals are employed by companies to invent, imagine something new and dream up something better. The modern workplace demand new ways of thinking and human creativity is critical to that.

 6. Emotional intelligence (EQ)

Another area where humans excel is EQ – our ability to be aware of, control, and express our emotions as well as understanding the emotions of others. This ability will remain essential as long as there are humans in the workforce since it influences every interaction we have with one another.

 7. Cultural intelligence and diversity

Companies are increasingly diverse, and effective employees must be able to respect differences and work with people of a different race, religion, age, gender, or sexual orientation. Employees with a keen cultural intelligence and who can empathise with those who perceive the world differently are vital to developing a more inclusive and robust business environment for the organisation.

 8. Leadership skills

Leadership skills will be paramount for not only those at the top of a traditional corporate hierarchy but increasingly for those individuals throughout the company who are expected to embrace the modern workplace. Possessing an understanding how to bring out the best in and inspire employees and colleagues within a diverse and fast-moving workplace needs strong leadership skills.

 9. Judgment and decision making

Individuals with the ability to take input from the data while considering how decisions can impact the broader community, including effects on human sensibilities such as morale, are crucial members of the team. So, even if the data support one course of action, a human needs to step in to think about how a decision might impact other areas of the organisation, including its people.

10. Collaboration

When organisations are seeking individuals to thrive in the modern workplace, skills that are uniquely human such as collaboration and strong interpersonal skills will be highly prized – employees who can interact well with others and help drive the business forward as a team.
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/top-10-job-skills-for-2020/

4 reasons why developing tomorrow’s leaders should matter to every CEO

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4 reasons why developing tomorrow’s leaders should matter to every CEO

One reason why Magesvaran Suranjan, President, Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Africa, P&G, believes in building the capabilities of those who are about to enter the workforce is the opportunity to see the world through their eyes.
  I have been incredibly fortunate, having had multiple, diverse assignments and responsibilities during my 25-year career. From beginning my career as a cost analyst in the US, to leading a beauty business in China, having a global sales role, handling business planning for an entire company, leading marketing for billion-dollar brands across Asia Pacific; today, I get to serve our consumers across 105 countries in Asia Pacific Middle East & Africa. These remarkable opportunities are why I believe firmly that I have two degrees; one at university, and the other I got at P&G. Strong leaders have mentored and coached me throughout my career, which has been a special blessing. But I also recognise that the business world is changing, and the job market today is very different to what it was thirty years back.
We are in the age of the gig economy, where technology is disrupting the workplace and workforce. We are also faced with the twin issues of millions of young people entering the job market in my region (Asia Pacific, the Middle East and Africa), and education systems which must pivot to produce leaders who are ready for the fourth industrial revolution. Traveling throughout the region, what is most striking is the talent and energy of this region’s youth. What I also see is an opportunity for the private sector to come together, to help develop the region’s talent, and specifically to build the next generation of entrepreneurs and shapers.
I believe that today’s business leaders should pay back our good fortune. Take P&G as an example; we are described as an engine that makes leaders, and we have helped develop many CEOs. What we have done recently is open our internal training programs, to help develop the next generation of leaders externally. We have begun this with our distributor partners from across Asia, the Middle East and Africa with our one of a kind ‘CEO of the Future’ program. What we have done is unusual, but I believe that it is more important than ever for business executives and firms to take up this cause and build a legacy of future CEOs who will, in turn, create wealth and shape the future. Here are the four reasons why this cause should matter to every business leader today.

1. Practice makes perfect

There is a mismatch between graduate skills and the needs of the job market. Companies can fill a gap, to promote practical, on-the-job learning through internships that offer young people and future leaders an opportunity to tackle real business problems. Is there anything more inspiring than giving them a chance to be part of a successful business, and working alongside business leaders who see their potential? It will provide them with the fundamental lessons they need to become successful business leaders.

2. Culture is key

Leadership does not exist in a vacuum. Character and values are the prerequisites of any successful executive. When we hire, we look beyond experience and skills to a person’s beliefs. We want them to have the ability to be able to both do the right thing, look longer-term and see a business opportunity where others see nothing. With the younger generation, I meet many people who want to have a social impact as well as make a profit. By helping to forge their characters and showing them how much the notion of integrity and doing the right thing matters in business, they will become entrepreneurs who champion social causes for value creation.

3. Reverse learning

One reason why I believe in building the capabilities of those who are about to enter the workforce is the opportunity to see the world through their eyes. Many of you will have heard about reverse mentoring, where senior executives are given an education by their younger peers on subjects like technology, social media and current trends. There is much business leaders have to learn from youth if we hope to remain relevant.

4. Confidence to call your shot

In a world that is changing at such a dramatic pace – and will change even faster for the coming generation – future leaders will not always know what is around the corner. Many of our successes at P&G have been because we called our shot and put a stake in the ground. Future CEOs will need to learn this skill and navigate an uncertain tomorrow, if they hope to be in the driving seat of the future. I have been fortunate enough to have had a diverse, fun and successful career, helped in part by people who have role modelled leadership. Today’s business leaders must do the same, and pay it back, to create the CEOs of tomorrow.
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/4-reasons-why-developing-tomorrows-leaders-should-matter-to-every-ceo/

What recruiters should look for in a video resume

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What recruiters should look for in a video resume

While a digital PDF remains the most popular resume format, many tech-savvy younger workers, especially those who are working in the creative or media industry, are turning their attention to video format. Glassdoor recently shed light on the four factors recruiters should look for in a video resume:

1. Storytelling

A video resume should give applicants the opportunity to contextualise their work experience and tell a convincing narrative about themselves so that it resonates and sticks with recruiters in a unique way. The biggest mistake a candidate can make with a video resume is to simply read out their qualifications.
For example, they should explain how the job fits into their career and ambitions, as well as why they are excited about the opportunity. As the hiring manager, you should have a picture of who he or she are and why that specific candidate would be perfect for the job.

2. Tailor-made

Not every company will have the same level of formality, work culture, and expectations. The video resume should reflect these differences and address them specifically. Similar to a cover letter, look for details that shows the candidate has carefully read the job posting, and if he or she has emphasised any specific skills and qualities. 

3. The KISS rule (Keep it simple, stupid)

The ideal video resume should be immediately engaging and no longer than 90 seconds. This duration should give the candidates enough time to touch on their most relevant qualifications, without wasting your time with fluff and unnecessary flourishes.

4. Professional

Professional here means the background of the video. Candidates should make sure the background of the video is minimalist and clean looking, that there are no distracting noises muffling the audio, the video quality is decent, and that they are at least wearing business casual attire. The bedroom as a filming location is not recommended. 
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/what-recruiters-should-look-for-in-a-video-resume/

Five top tips for managing Millennials

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Five top tips for managing Millennials

It’s official. According to a survey by the HR Director website, 32% of managers consider Millennials the most difficult group to manage in the workplace. It’s probably something HR practitioners have suspected for some time. But with an estimated 56 million Millennial-aged (born 1981-96) workers worldwide – and counting – it’s a demographic that demands HR’s attention. So how do you engage and get the most out of your Millennial talent? Here are five things to consider when managing that challenging demographic.

Pre-boarding is the new on-boarding

One of HR’s biggest challenge when managing new Millennial hires is to make the onboarding process smooth and illuminating. So organisations need to act as soon as an employee is hired. This is called the pre-boarding phase. Millennials want to feel like they’re part of a community and want to create strong bonds with their colleagues and managers. Pre-boarding is the ideal way to achieve this. The first step can be to invite these new hires to join the organisation’s employee communications platform and encourage them to start sharing content. Another good idea is to assign them a buddy prior to their start date to answer questions about the organisation’s vision, culture and dress code.

Real-time requirement

Being the first generation to grow up in the digital age, Millennials are regarded as an impatient lot – looking for instant gratification. This pattern of impatience can also be seen in the way Millennials communicate in the workplace – they expect communications to be in real time and don’t want to wait for days, let alone hours, for a response. The same goes for feedback. Millennials demand timely, transparent communications so that they can make the necessary improvements to become more efficient and effective in their roles.

A sense of purpose

Millennials are idealistic in all aspects of their lives, including their career choices. Personal fulfillment is important to them. One way that employers can nurture this is to get creative with the company’s online platform – using it to foster a sense of shared purpose. Activities could include learning and development content, celebrating team and individual achievements and motivating and incentivising improved performance. An increased sense of satisfaction through a more meaningful and engaging experience will meant the organisation is more likely to keep its Millennial talent – a generation with a reputation for job hopping.

The social network

Millennials are social animals and take great deal of satisfaction through sharing their experiences, accomplishments, thoughts and feelings across social media. A total of 46 percent of HR professionals surveyed stated that their Millennial employees want an employee communications platform with a similar functionality and experience to their after-hour social media networks.

Balancing act

Work-life balance is very high on the list of Millennials’ priorities. They don’t measure success based on climbing the corporate ladder. Success is defined by having a sense of control over and how engaged they are with their workplace – while being able to savour life experiences that truly matter.
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/five-top-tips-for-managing-millennials/

Challenges mount for global HR functions

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Challenges mount for global HR functions

It is becoming increasingly complex for multinational firms to employ staff, at every stage of the employee lifecycle – according to a new report. ‘Building a Workforce’, part of the 2019 Global Business Complexity Index which analysed 76 different jurisdictions worldwide in terms of ease of doing business, revealed that half (50%) of countries’ labour laws are difficult to understand. Here are the key findings:
  • Multinational firms face a number of challenges when it comes to recruitment. Hiring staff before having formally established a local legal entity is especially tricky – particularly in the EMEA (Europe, the Middle East, and Africa) region where it is seen as either ‘complex’ or ‘extremely complex’ in the majority of jurisdictions. Once established, hiring workers from abroad remains difficult globally, in fact almost twice as hard as employing someone from within your home jurisdiction, with a complexity rating of 6.4 as opposed to 3.6.
  • Overall, 89% of jurisdictions surveyed now have a minimum wage, 87% offer paid maternity leave and 84% offer paid time off. But some elements of employee compensation have marked regional differences. For example, shared parental leave is required in 63% of jurisdictions across the United States, but just 33% in APAC. Meanwhile, APAC leads the way in pension provision – a fund must be offered in 79% of its jurisdictions, compared to 63% in the US and 50% in EMEA.
  • Almost half (45%) of jurisdictions surveyed reported that payroll legislation is subject to frequent change. The problem is particularly acute in EMEA (frequent changes occur in 55% of jurisdictions) – although relatively stable across APAC (36%). A total of 76% of jurisdictions globally require companies to submit employees’ payroll data to the government at least once a month.
  • In the US, 52% of jurisdictions allow businesses to terminate employment contracts in less than a day. In APAC this figure is just 8% and in EMEA 6%.
“Regulations and statutory reporting that concern the ethical treatment of workers and their data are increasing. However, even within regulatory frameworks, interpretation varies across locations, and processes change. The result of all this is complexity. And to counter that complexity, companies need the flexibility and agility to accommodate rapidly changing employment legislation for every territory they operate in – whether they employ thousands of workers or just one,” said Anne Clifford, TMF Group’s global head of HR & Payroll.  
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/challenges-mount-for-global-hr-functions/