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Are you earning more than your peers?

 in Hong Kong by 

Are you earning more than your peers?

The Hong Kong workforce (excluding domestic helpers) earned a median monthly income of HK$18,700 across all jobs, HK$300 less than the preceding quarter, according to the Hong Kong Census and Statistics Department’s latest quarterly report on General Household Survey.   Overall, there was a surge in the size of the labour force, from last year’s 3,969.4 million to 3,985 million. The median monthly household income was HK$28,500, HK$500 less than the first quarter. The median usual hours worked per week (excluding domestic helpers) was 43 hours, which is more than eight hours per weekday. Meanwhile, 15% of people worked over 60 hours or above per week.   The industries with the longest working hours are retail, accommodation and food services (48 hours), followed by public administration, social and personal services, and manufacturing (45 hours). The International Labour Organisation suggested the maximum weekly working hours should be 40 hours or less. ————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————- Here is a table of the Hong Kong workforce’s median monthly salary: By age
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original can be found at 
https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/are-you-earning-more-than-your-peers/

Google to axe its recruiting tool Google Hire in 2020

 in All markets by 

Google to axe its recruiting tool Google Hire in 2020

Dos and don’ts for HR when issuing a formal warning

 in All markets by 

Dos and don’ts for HR when issuing a formal warning

  It’s one of the more onerous jobs of an HR professional. Nobody likes giving a formal warning letter. But in every people manager’s career – when handling an underperforming employee – there will most likely be times that it’s necessary to issue one. One unscrupulous employer known to Human Resources has, on at least one occasion, used a formal warning letter to shame an employee into quitting. That is not what a formal warning is for. Why issue a formal warning? By definition, a formal warning is a letter that is part of a member of staff’s file for future reference. It clearly outlines concerns surrounding performance or misconduct and any necessary action plan of what the employee needs to do to improve. It’s important to note that it is, but one step with which to deal with employee performance issues, and according to Alex Hattingh, chief people officer at cloud-based HR management system, Employment Hero, it shouldn’t be the first. “The number one rule regarding formal written warnings is that they should never be a surprise to an employee,” she says. Performance concerns should be raised during private one-on-one meetings and written warnings should only take place after all other avenues have been exhausted. Escalating an informal warning to the next level Hattingh advises that prior to issuing a formal written warning, try to resolve the issue with an informal verbal warning to make the employee aware they aren’t meeting the expectations of their role. While this isn’t written, you do need to clearly articulate the particular areas of underperformance. If verbal warnings don’t result in noticeable improvements in performance – or at the very least, endeavour – you may want to proceed to the formal written warning. Components of a formal written warning Reference your informal verbal conversation(s) and include key dates.
  • Specify details of the areas where your employee is underperforming and always provide examples.
  • Reference the number of the warning letter (first, second, third).
  • Create an action plan and communicate dates that you plan to check-in with your employee.
  • Make it clear that another written warning could be issued or employment could be terminated if expectations are not met.
  • Reassure your employee that the warning is confidential.
Hattingh advises: “You should always discuss the specifics of the written warning letter with your employee prior to physically delivering it as it allows them to ask questions and clarify any issues or concerns before they receive and review it in writing.” Formal written warnings and the law To the strict letter of the law, there is no legal requirement to provide a formal written warning before termination, although an employee can claim they have been unfairly dismissed if they haven’t been given fair warning and a reasonable amount of time to improve their performance. The appropriate number of warnings is not set in stone. It is based on what is fair and reasonable, taking into account nature and seriousness of the underperformance and what level of progress the employee is making to come up to the organisation’s standards.  
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original can be found at 
https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/dos-and-donts-for-hr-when-issuing-a-formal-warning/

Eight ways to improve company culture

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Eight ways to improve company culture

Is it time to let top talent work remotely?

 in All markets by 

Is it time to let top talent work remotely?

It’s an appealing scenario. The opportunity to work anywhere, anytime. Escaping the confines of the office to work in a much more inspiring location. But surely that’s affording too much freedom, even for your organisation’s best and brightest? Not necessarily. The data is in – and it is emphatically suggesting that remote work is increasing. A 2017 Gallup poll revealed that 43% of employees had spent at least part of their time working remotely. While a recent study of US workers showed that 5.2% of them worked entirely from home. Helped by the rise of the gig economy, working from home is becoming relatively common. But a new form of remote work is definitely emerging: Working from anywhere. In this situation, employees can live and work where they choose. This is generally within a particular country, but in some cases can occur anywhere in the world – all that is needed is a reliable internet connection. Some highly respected companies, in fact, are already adopting this policy. Enterprise software developer SAP and cloud-service provider Akamai are two organisations already taking steps in allowing employees to work from anywhere. Anecdotal evidence suggests, however, that HR – particularly in Asia – may not be ready to embrace such a laissez-faire approach to managing their charges, equating working remotely with working less. In addition, there are also justifiable concerns that allowing employees to work from anywhere could decrease communication and collaboration with colleagues and constrain the informal learning that typically takes place in the more formal setting of the office. However, in one 2015 study based on results from a Chinese travel agency, when call centre employees had the option of working from home, their productivity went up by an average of 13% – due to a reduction in break time and sick days (and presumably commute time) in combination with a more comfortable work environment. There is also strong evidence that employees value the option to work remotely. A 2017 study revealed the average employee is willing to accept 8% less pay for the chance to work from home. This indicates that employees assign monetary value to the flexibility afforded by a work-from-home policy. And with a work-from-anywhere policy, organisations add even more value to employees by granting them geographic flexibility. If a work setting is suitable for remote work – the job is fairly independent and the employee knows their job well – implementing a work-from-anywhere policy might just benefit both the organisation and the employee.  
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This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. 
Original can be found at 
https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/is-it-time-to-let-top-talent-work-remotely/