Five tips to write the perfect job description

04/07/2018 Wed 09:43 in All markets by Bridgette Hall

Five tips to write the perfect job description

It’s clear that there is a war for talent and HR need to be on their A game in attracting the best in the market. One of the ways to do that is the often overlooked job description. HR and hiring managers often focus on compensation and benefits, employee engagement and company culture. However, your first point of call in attracting the best candidates is using the job description to wow potential talent.
If your job description is too casual that mentions only perks it cannot only attract the wrong candidates but also leave potential ones uninformed. On the other hand, if a description is laden with company-specific jargon and a wishlist a mile long it could turn a lot of potential skilled talent off that feel like they don’t tick every criterion of the ad.
“A well-written job description can mean the difference between a trickle or a flurry of qualified applicants,” said staffing expert Diane Domeyer, executive director of The Creative Group to Robert Half. “Conversely, a poorly written job description can significantly expand the quantity of unqualified applicants. Writing a good job description requires an ability to prioritise essential skills and qualities while also ‘selling’ your company to job seekers.”
The key is both informative and inspiring and recruitment site Robert Half has these recommendations.
1. The blueprint
You have recruited plenty, so having the basics down makes the whole process a lot easier. Make sure to include;
The job or position title, the department within the organisation the position is for, a summary of the position and the job responsibilities. the position’s essential duties, educational requirements, specific knowledge, skills, work history, or other experiences, training, language, or aptitudes required for the job and qualities or attributes that contribute to superior performance in the position.
2. Keep updating
As technology changes so too will the requirements of the job. So if at first, you don’t catch any fish update, update, update and try again.
3. Keep your priorities in order
Don’t scare off potential candidates with too many “must haves”. Instead of providing a laundry list give five or six essential attributes that are crucial to the position.
4. Unicorns don’t exist
Everyone wants rock star candidates but that could mean waiting too long and missing out on a diamond in the rough. Don’t have unrealistic expectations but rather know what skills are uncompromising and what can be developed. Rather focus on someone who fits the company culture than hunt for a unicorn.
5. Inject your personality
While clear and concise language is important, use the job ad as an opportunity to showcase your company’s culture. The wrong fit can be truly costly so take the time to paint a picture of what its like to work at the company.
Lead photo / StockUnlimited
This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at  http://www.humanresourcesonline.net/five-tips-to-write-the-perfect-job-description/

5 tips to be a fair manager

21/06/2018 Thu 10:00 in All markets by Bridgette Hall

5 tips to be a fair manager

If you’re a manager with a lot on your plate you might be neglecting your employees according to a new study by the Academy of management. The research showed that when a boss is overworked their employees needs drop to the bottom of their priority list.
In fact, across three studies done by the academy, the results showed that the more a manager’s workload increases they will prioritise what’s best for the company at the expense of overlooking fairness towards employees. Often bosses tend to forget their principles when under pressure. The research gives these tips for dealing with employees so that you remain fair and principled when you’re feeling swamped.
  •  Make sure to dedicate time to your employees so that they feel heard.
  • No matter how busy you are, treat your employees with dignity and respect.
  • Make decisions that apply consistently to everyone.
  • Explain the logic and rationale to employees behind difficult decisions.
  • Acknowledge all your employees’ contributions no matter how busy you are.
The same research also showed that managers who work in environments that reward and recognise fair management the company will start to value it too. Google is famed for its perks, lunches and time for employees to work on their own projects. It also has a Great Manager award given to managers who consistently express interest and concern for their employees’ continued success.
Ultimately, when you work in an environment that sees happy employees as a core leadership task, then management will reflect this.
Lead photo / StockUnlimited
This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at  http://www.humanresourcesonline.net/5-tips-to-be-a-fair-manager/

Is your noisy office making staff quit?

14/06/2018 Thu 11:14 in All markets by Wani Azahar

Is your noisy office making staff quit?

According to the findings of Plantronics, noise pollution of the open office has grown much worse since Oxford Economics conducted its first study in 2015. In a recent release, Oxford Economics found that open office conditions are dramatically declining. The majority of executives and employees report near-constant noise in their workplace and many say they lack quiet space for meetings or to focus. In fact, conditions are much worse now than three years ago.
Only 1% of employees (down from 20 percent in 2015) say they are able to block out distractions and concentrate without taking extra steps in the office. Meanwhile, more than half (54%) of executives believe their employees have the tools they need to mitigate noise and distraction in the office, but only 29% of employees agree (down from 41% in 2015) – showing that the executive disconnect remains.
The release said: “As a result, employees are taking matters into their own hands by leaving or tuning out their surroundings to get work done with 75% of employees saying they need to take walks outside to focus, and 32% use headphones to block out distraction.”
“Additionally, employees in the noisiest office environments are more likely to say they may leave their job in the next six months,” it added.
On another hand, the findings suggest that noise and distraction impact wellness, productivity and even financial performance. However, executives aren’t doing enough to address the problem. The study revealed that 63% of employees say they lack quiet space for focused work, which has a negative effect on their productivity, satisfaction and well-being.
Meanwhile, 96% of executives see employee productivity as critical to their financial performance, yet only 40% understand the link between noise, distraction and productivity. On that note, only 6% of executives report having equipped their office with noise mitigating features.
According to the study, Millennials are more accustomed to an open office versus older colleagues, likely because they started careers in such a setting. Despite that, they are the first to acknowledge the issues that come with these environments and tend to deal with these challenges differently than their older colleagues.
Meanwhile, Millennials are much less likely to say they find a noisy working environment energising (9% versus 30% of older colleagues). Additionally, Millennials are less satisfied with their office layout than older employees (38% of millennials versus 48% of others). Millennials are also more likely to say their organisation should address noise, distraction and information overload (89% versus 75% of older coworkers); while more Millennials are likely to take walks outside to focus (84% versus 63% of older employees), and less likely to use an office break room or quiet space.
The survey shows a correlation between companies’ revenue growth and how those same companies approach their work environments.
More than three-quarters of top performers (revenue growth above 10% and one with less turnover) report that office design and noise mitigation are important to financial performance and are proactively addressing the noise epidemic in their offices.
“These top performing companies are more likely to provide workers with tools to block out noise and quiet space to focus,” it said.
Photo / 123RF
This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at  http://www.humanresourcesonline.net/is-your-noisy-office-making-staff-quit/

The drivers and consequences of the rapidly evolving modern office

27/06/2018 Wed 09:56 in All markets by Bridgette Hall

The drivers and consequences of the rapidly evolving modern office

Flexible workspaces will be what attracts talent, energises districts and drives efficiency as the workforce as we know it evolves before our very eyes. Recent changes in workspace design are profound and probably irreversible. In a panel discussion at the Urban land institute’s ULI Asia Pacific Summit this month business leaders, real estate developers and brokers discussed the drivers and consequences of the rapidly evolving modern office.
“The key from what we’re seeing from a tenant trend point of view is that not every tenant is the same. There is no generic right answer to how they operate, to how they use their space,” said Neil Anderson Director and Head of Office, Hong Kong for HongKong Land Limited. “They’re all very different in the way they occupy their space, for different reasons. The trend we’re seeing is that office space is an experience. We’re seeing that more and more with the design of space. Functionality is one thing but the experience of going to work is changing and tenants are changing that through their fit out and their organisations and how they operate and break silos down in many cases.”
Amenities were talked about as key drivers of the future of office space. As well as a trend toward increased health and wellness facilities at work. “We’re seeing two very distinct drivers for moving towards an agile work model,” said Nina James General Manager, Corporate Sustainability at Investa. The first she says is efficiency and the other is talent retention. In Hong Kong where talent retention is a key for successful organisations, tenants are looking towards their offices to do that.
If you’re trying to attract the best talent says, James, they want to see things like yoga lunch classes, on-site nutritionists, meditation classes and child care. Landlords need to go beyond proving a great event space but have a cater and full concierge to help businesses attract the top echelon of talent. “If you need someone to pick up your dry cleaning or buy tickets for a show, we are now operating like a hotel,” said James.
Hotdesks, remote working, co-working and flexibility have become the norm but what’s next asked moderator Peter Weingarten, Regional managing principal for Gensler Asia Pacific. “Will technology determines how we work.”
“Now technology is used as a tool to do your work,” said Jun Nepomuceno Managing Director, Asia Pacific Head, Global and Real Estate for JP Morgan.“But probably going forward, its technology that will determine how you work.”
The one thing that is non-negotiable for the future of workspaces is innovation and workplaces need to support that innovation.
Lead photo / StockUnlimited
This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at http://www.humanresourcesonline.net/the-drivers-and-consequences-of-the-rapidly-evolving-modern-office/

HaTCH Event on 19th July 2018: ‘Everything you need to know about Talent & HR’

HaTCH Event on 19th July 2018: ‘Everything you need to know about Talent & HR’

Our CEO, Cindy Chui, recently spoke at the panel for ‘Everything you need to know about Talent & HR’ for HaTCH. Which she discussed the importance of HR and Talent in startups with Derek Koo from OKAY.com屋企, Anu Pathay from MoneySmart and Alice Schütt from Mettā . The event mentioned areas such as talent management advice, HR support and how to grow your team effectively.
 
Panel Speakers for the event.
Q&A Session of the night.