Infographic: How to spend your first and last 15 minutes at work

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Infographic: How to spend your first and last 15 minutes at work

Being mindful of our work habits can help us assess how we are spending our time and allows us to identify opportunities for improvement. Working smarter, not harder means making simple shifts to our day that can have a big impact on how we feel and the work we produce.
An infographic by Fundera provides 10 tips to create an intentional routine that will help boost performance and happiness at work. For example, did you know staying hydrated results in a 14% increase in productivity?

Here are tips on how to spend the first and last minutes of your work day:

First 15 minutes of the day:

  • DO make a list of the tasks you wish to accomplish throughout the day in order of importance
  • DON’T dive right into your to-do list without taking a few deep breaths
  • DO drink a glass of water to help stay hydrated after the commute
  • DON’T get caught up with office gossip first thing in the morning

Last 15 minutes of the day:

  • DO send quick emails and take care of small clerical tasks
  • DON’T leave your workplace in a frenzy as you head out the door
  • DO get anything on your mind down on paper before leaving
  • DON’T beat yourself up if you didn’t get everything you wanted accomplished

Infographics / Fundera Lead image / iStock
This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/infographic-how-to-spend-your-first-and-last-15-minutes-at-work/

Companies put out whimsical job titles to attract Millennials

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Companies put out whimsical job titles to attract Millennials

 
While many businesses are trying to make sense with all the new positions like community manager or content strategist, companies around the world are rebranding traditional job titles to more distinctive ones.
This is done for several reasons. According to the Wall Street Journal, one of the key reasons is to grasp the younger job seekers’ attention, and to send a message to that these companies are willing to take risks and are innovative.
For instance, a U.S. print company hires “growth hacker”, a term that has gained popularity among the online and social media community. The company’s marketing head also argues that using more distinctive titles helps them attract the right candidates.
Some companies rebrand the titles to reflect the nature of the job more graphically. For example, a “developer evangelist” needs to educate potential clients about the company’s products, and should exude the passion and energy the role takes. This works for the Millennials because it speaks to their deeper desires – they want their jobs to mean something.
The Journal also reported that a shoeshine company calls their workers “shine artists” instead of shoeshine boys. The new title does not only boost employees’ self-image, it also gives the dignity the workers deserve.
This title rebranding, nonetheless, is not without its shortcomings, including senior job seekers having trouble understanding what the job entails, and difficulty in explaining the job to future employers.

This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found athttps://www.humanresourcesonline.net/companies-put-out-whimsical-job-titles-to-attract-millennials/

Matthew Cheung: Three challenges HR is facing

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Matthew Cheung: Three challenges HR is facing

Matthew Cheung Kin-chung, Hong Kong Chief Secretary for Administration, recently wrote on his government blog about the current labour landscape. He stated three formidable challenges today’s human resources is facing – an ever-changing external environment, declining labour quality and a shortage of the working population.
Notwithstanding these challenges, the window for alleviating the situation has not been shut entirely. Hong Kong can still use its clout on the global scene and leverage its workforce.

Detailed elaboration of the proposed three challenges:

1. Ever changing external environment: Hong Kong is facing an uphill battle in the age of a fluctuating global economy, protectionism creeping into the world and technology breakthroughs.
The new wave of innovation and technology hubs has swept the world and distorted the current business model. In particular, automation will eventually contrive a change in business structures and job nature.
Local labour has to upskill themselves regularly.
2. Declining quality of the workforce: Cheung observes a mismatch between the skills required and the current capabilities of the workforce.
There is also insufficient local talent to support the current diverse economic development, especially the emerging high valued-added industries.
3. A shortage of the working population: In the past 20 years, the size of workforce has been one of the prominent factors that has boosted overall economic growth.
According to the Census and Statistics Department’s “Hong Kong Population Projections 2017-2066”, the current number of the elderly (1.27 million) is projected to peak in 19 years at 2.37 million, which is 31.1% of the total population.
The ageing population will jeopardise Hong Kong’s status in the global economy.
Cheung urges to liberate the local labour by attracting global talent and utilising innovation and technology.

This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/matthew-cheung-three-challenges-hr-is-facing/

Hongkongers’ perceptions on how to get ahead in life and career

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Hongkongers’ perceptions on how to get ahead in life and career

   
A recent survey, “Inaugural Linkedin Opportunity Index 2018”, revealed that Hongkongers’ attitudes towards accessible opportunities in job markets was ranked the second lowest among nine countries in the Asia Pacific region.
Growing economies such as Indonesia, India, Mainland China and the Philippines, on the other hand, are more confident in gaining access to and pursuing opportunities than more established economies such as Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia or Japan.
Hongkongers are currently seeking a rewarding job (18%), a prospect to be their own boss (13%), a learning opportunity ( 13%) and career advancement (12%). Their utopia is to have more options in life (46%), maintain a work-life balance (42%) and be able to utilise skills (38%), which is strongly echoed by other professionals in the Asia Pacific region.
Meanwhile, 86% of Hongkongers believe knowing the right people or having the right connections are the golden keys to getting ahead in life.
With the concept of “work more, gain more” popularised during the 1980s, it is no surprise that 84% concede to the belief that working hard is essential to success. The rest includes the willingness to embrace change (82%), level of education (81%), equal access to opportunities (80% and an innate factor – born with a silver spoon (51%).
The largest barriers to success are the lack of the right connections (32%), financial status (26%) and a challenging job market (22%).
Hong Kong professionals recognise the need to upskill to stay relevant in the advent of AI and robotic technology. Moreover, having good soft skills such as leadership, negotiation and communication should not be neglected.
1,024 professionals were interviewed for LinkedIn’s Inaugural LinkedIn Opportunity Index 2018.

This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/hongkongers-perceptions-on-how-to-get-ahead-in-life-and-career/

Singapore snatches Hong Kong’s Asia crown on IMD World Talent Ranking

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Singapore snatches Hong Kong’s Asia crown on IMD World Talent Ranking

Switzerland-based International Institute for Management Development recently released the2018 IMD World Talent Ranking which examines the talent pool of 63 territories around the world based on three factors: investment and development (the resources committed to cultivate home-grown human capital), appeal (the attractiveness of the country towards local and foreign talent), and readiness (the quality of the skills and competencies).
Here are the top 40:
The majority of the top spots are held by Europeans and mid-sized economies, which have high levels of investments in education and quality of life.
Hong Kong was placed 18th in the world talent rankings this year, dropping six notches from last year. On the other hand, its trade rival Singapore managed to come first among all Asian economies in 13th place.
Local labour has to upskill themselves regularly.
It was revealed from the report the reason for Hong Kong’s decline was due to the lack of public investment in education.
“The talent strengths are in appealing to overseas highly skilled professionals which enables it to sustain its top-tier talent pool, however, its gradual decline is worrying for the future, especially considering that it lags behind in terms of public investments in education,” the report said.
Indeed, let’s look at the chart:
The total public expenditure on education in Hong Kong in terms of the GDP is ranked 56 out of 63 economies. In this section, only the rank of the female labour force stood out.
Despite the poor performance in investment and development, Hong Kong performed well in appeal and readiness.
The chief executive of Hong Kong, Carrie Lam, reassured the public that since her inauguration her administration has put in an additional HK$8.3 billion in recurrent expenditure, which is approximately a 10% increase.
CheuShe pledged to conduct policy reviews from time to time and allocate more resources for students to develop their creativity and cultivate an international mindset.

Photo/SCMP
This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at https://www.humanresourcesonline.net/singapore-snatches-hong-kongs-asia-crown-on-imd-world-talent-ranking/