Author Archive

HR Tech Clinic on 13th June 2018

From left to right: Cindy Chui (FastLane HR), David Rosa (Neat) and Gordon Ng (Talenox)

Cindy from FastLane HR is talking about “Deductions, Allowances and Employees’ Housing Benefits in Hong Kong”
  • Cindy from FastLane HR is talking about “Deductions, Allowances and Employees’ Housing Benefits in Hong Kong”
  • DESCRIPTION Come join us for another HR Tech Clinic on 13 June, Wednesday! CEO Gordon Ng will show you the basics of HR housekeeping and give you valuable tips to using the Profiles, Payroll, and Leave apps easily. You’ll learn how to: onboard employees run payroll calculate MPF and tax contributions apply for, review, and manage your company’s leave customise leave settings For those familiar with the platform, we’ll be explaining our newest features and answering your questions. Feel free
  • From left to right: Natalie Fong (Wesurance), Gordon Ng (Talenox) and Cindy Chui (FastLane HR) Cindy from FastLane HR is talking about  “Statutory Leave, MPF requirement, Work Visa applications and Employment Issues in Hong Kong”
  • 05/04/2018 Thu 11:10 in All markets by Aditi Sharma Kalra Managers, how many hours a day do you spend on admin tasks? In a US-based survey of 500 managers, it was found a majority of them (36%) spend in the range of 3-4 hours per day on administrative tasks, such as responding to emails and submitting expense claims. Conducted by West Monroe, a close second was the range of 1-2 hours per day, cited by 34% of managers. More than
  • 16/03/2018 Fri 11:25 in All markets by Jerene Ang What HR needs to do to prepare staff for the future of work On the back of its global research, Dell Technologies yesterday explored technology’s implications on the workforce in a two fireside chats involving visionaries and experts. The dialogue, Realising the Future of Work: A Divided Vision, sparked discussion on the changing relationship between technology and people, emerging technologies’ impact on society, and how business leaders plan to succeed over
  • Offices and professional relationships can be a tricky thing to navigate. Sometimes you just want to be brutally honest but well let’s face it that would make thing extremely awkward. Reader’s Digest compiled this list of all the truths your office colleagues wish they could say and if you can’t how they get around it dropping some not so subtle hints. 1. “Do you want a mint?” Truth: A not so subtle hint that you need to do something about your

HR Tech Clinic on 10th May 2018

From left to right: Natalie Fong (Wesurance), Gordon Ng (Talenox) and Cindy Chui (FastLane HR)

Cindy from FastLane HR is talking about  “Statutory Leave, MPF requirement, Work Visa applications and Employment Issues in Hong Kong”

What HR needs to do to prepare staff for the future of work

16/03/2018 Fri 11:25 in All markets by Jerene Ang

What HR needs to do to prepare staff for the future of work

On the back of its global research, Dell Technologies yesterday explored technology’s implications on the workforce in a two fireside chats involving visionaries and experts.
The dialogue, Realising the Future of Work: A Divided Vision, sparked discussion on the changing relationship between technology and people, emerging technologies’ impact on society, and how business leaders plan to succeed over the next 10 to 15 years.
In the first fireside chat, David Yeo, chief learning architect, Kydon Group, pointed out that organisations must get people to embrace change by allowing them to challenge existing mindsets in a safe environment.
When asked about how this safe environment can be created, Yeo said, “I think you create it in two levels. The first is creating opportunities. For example, DBS with their hackathons and workshops.”
He noted that this is a fail-safe and risk-safe way of exposing people to the interesting things they can do with technology such as AI and robotics and challenge them to think very differently. However, he also pointed out that alone isn’t enough; we also need to bring it into the real work space.
“Bringing that into the real work space requires us to set aside a certain amount of time and space to think differently,” Yeo said.
He likened it to flying a plane and doing engineering to fix it, saying ,”we can’t be flying while trying to fix the plane. So we have to set time aside, we have to set space aside, and I dare say organisations have to set resources and money aside whereby they can create opportunities for staff to do something different.”
To that, Paul Henaghan, vice-president, data centre solutions – Asia Pacific and Japan, Dell EMC, who moderated the discussions, emphasised that it’s more than just putting a culture code in place.
“It’s all very easy to say that we have a culture of learning and risk etc, but it’s the actions that follow the words that is most critical.”
Henaghan cited the example of a bank that put an award in place, named after an employee who put a line of code into a digital platform that had the unintended effect of bringing the ATM network down years ago.
“It is a badge of honour every year to win that award. That is much more powerful than a culture code or other words,” he explained.
Dimitri Chen, COO and vice president of specialty sales – Asia Pacific and Japan, Dell EMC, closed the first discussion, saying: “The reality of things is that technology has democratised resources. The real competitive edge is to look at the ability of individuals and the organisations and of departments to learn and out-learn one another and that is the key.”
In the second fireside chat, when asked about automation, job losses, and the direction in which jobs are moving, Pang Yee Beng, senior vice president – commercial business – South Asia and Korea, Dell EMC, and managing director – Dell Malaysia, said: “Research has said that 80% of jobs that you will find in 2030 haven’t been created yet. So we don’t know, and I will admit that I can’t predict where the jobs will be in the future and what they will be. But I think it will be in very different shapes and forms.”
Taking the example of self-driving cars, he noted that while we may not need drivers anymore, we still need people and resources to manage the systems such as GPS and to make sure the car comes back.
“So instead of the labour intensive, we now need people who sit higher up in the value chain to be able to control and monitor the car and make sure it is safe for its passengers,” Pang explained.
Speaking optimistically, he added that while jobs will be lost in certain areas, more will be created.
To that, Yeo added that we should see technology as something that empowers us, saying, “if we embrace that, and the workforce embraces that, and be willing to learn, willing to change, it will be a great world.”
When asked how HR can nudge the workforce to embrace the change technology brings about, Henaghan noted that HR has to leverage on these tools to develop very personal relationship with employees.
“Particularly when you look at the world we live in where we talk about solo entrepreneurs and contingent workers and contract workers and etc. there’s not a lot of permanency in it. My longest stint was about eight years in a company whereas my dad lived in a world where they’re at a company for their entire lives.
“Today, the average is about two years. Therefore, you have to very quickly develop a very personal and value based relationship with the employee and I think that’s the critical part of the HR function moving forward,” Henaghan said.
Yeo, on the other hand, felt that the mindset “change is constant” has to be drummed down throughout the whole organisation. At the same time, he pointed out that leaders and HR professionals should not forget about flaming the passion in employees.
“I think one of the key ingredients is flaming the passion in the work they are doing – it is something we have forgotten. When we have the passion, we can then build the skillsets.”
As for the skillsets, the most important to Yeo was “learning to learn” with self-directedness being a key part of this.
Pang shared that apart from that, HR should re-look at the criteria used to benchmark candidates.
Sharing what he learnt when he spoke to a US-based cloud computing company, he noted that the company looks for four key things in candidates – empathy, speed of working and thinking, if they are able to handle abstract, and if they are able to code (algorithms).
The event ended with an exclusive #FutureOfWork showcase, featuring the latest XPS 13, by Hajar Ali, founder of Urbane Nomads (luxury adventure travel company), discussing the role of technology in powering a solopreneur’s lifestyle to increase productivity while fueling creativity.
Ali said: “The deskbound days of 9-to-5 workers are gone for most modern businesses and I’m no exception. Technology is empowering a new generation of ‘nomadic entrepreneurs’ who work on-the-go without the need for a physical office space. The flexibility to work from multiple locations is critical for my business without having to compromise on performance.”
This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at http://www.humanresourcesonline.net/what-hr-needs-to-do-to-prepare-staff-for-the-future-of-work/

HR Tech Clinic Hong Kong [HR Housekeeping]

DESCRIPTION


Come join us for another HR Tech Clinic on 13 June, Wednesday!

CEO Gordon Ng will show you the basics of HR housekeeping and give you valuable tips to using the Profiles, Payroll, and Leave apps easily. You’ll learn how to:
  • onboard employees
  • run payroll
  • calculate MPF and tax contributions
  • apply for, review, and manage your company’s leave customise leave settings
For those familiar with the platform, we’ll be explaining our newest features and answering your questions. Feel free to come on down with your laptops if you require some troubleshooting! Community Speaker Cindy Chui from FastLane HR will then talk about individual tax deductions and allowances, while David Rosa from Neat will talk about streamlining your finance operations and expense management.

DATE AND TIME

Wed 13 June 2018 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM HKT

LOCATION

Paperclip Startup Campus
3/F Nam Wo Hong Building, 148 Wing Lok Street, Sheung Wan


AGENDA
  • 3pm: Registration and networking
  • 3:10pm: Talenox updates + live demo of the platform
  • 3:55pm: Short break
  • 4:00pm: [Community Speaker] Cindy Chui – Fastlane HR ‘Individual tax deductions and allowances’
  • 4:30pm: [Community Speaker] David Rosa – Neat ‘Streamline your finance operations and expense management’
  • 5:00pm: Q&A + Networking

*Photos will be taken during the event. If you do not wish to be included in the photos, please let us know beforehand. ** Your email address may be shared with the Community Speakers so they can send you updates on their services. If you wish to opt out of this, please let us know by emailing us: hello@talenox.com

Managers, how many hours a day do you spend on admin tasks

05/04/2018 Thu 11:10 in All markets by Aditi Sharma Kalra

Managers, how many hours a day do you spend on admin tasks?

In a US-based survey of 500 managers, it was found a majority of them (36%) spend in the range of 3-4 hours per day on administrative tasks, such as responding to emails and submitting expense claims. Conducted by West Monroe, a close second was the range of 1-2 hours per day, cited by 34% of managers. More than one in five (23%) said they spend 5+ hours a day on admin tasks such as time tracking, while a small 7% said they spend an hour or less per day on these. The survey analysed that one of the most overlooked areas for business efficiency is managers. “Specifically, managers having the training and tools they need to streamline tasks and help the organisation reach its potential,” it stated. With a majority of managers claiming they are too bogged down with administrative tasks to provide adequate feedback and direction to their team, 44% frequently feel overwhelmed at work.
Gaps in managerial training
Another area studied was the lack of managerial training provided in organisations, where a majority (59%) of managers overseeing one to two people received no managerial training at all, along with a significant 41% of those who oversee three to five people. With no formal training in place, new managers turn to mimicking their previous bosses. 42% of new managers developed their management style by observing a previous manager, rather than through formalised training. Typically, managers are being trained on the job – nearly half of respondents with 10 or more years of managerial experience have received a nine or more hours of training. However, another 43% of those who have been managers for less than a year have received no training at all.
Other interesting statistics from the report include:
  • 33% of managers overseeing one to two people feel that the expectations of their role are not clearly defined and communicated.
  • Over 55% of manager find driving team and company success the most rewarding part of their jobs.
  • 44% of managers believe a more appropriately sized workload would allow them to spend more time managing people.
Lead photo / StockUnlimited Graphics / West Monroe This article was first published in Human Resources and is reproduced with permission. Original article can be found at http://www.humanresourcesonline.net/managers-how-many-hours-a-day-do-you-spend-on-admin-tasks/